Tag Archive: Japanese language

Mar 03

Closing out a year of National Holidays in Japan

Well, it’s over.  Last year I began posting about each and every national holiday celebrated in Japan….all fifteen of them!  I hope you’ve enjoyed reading and learning a bit more about the country. My foray into bi-lingual books for kids was prompted by the desire to write entertaining and informative books for children giving them an opportunity to learn …

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Jan 06

Japanese New Year

    O-Shogatsu (New Year’s Day) is the most festive occasion of the entire year for Japanese citizens . While we are scrambling for deals over the post-Christmas season, Japan is “closed for business”.  The Emperor’s birthday is celebrated on December 23 followed by traditional ceremonies and customs that last for several days.  Most Japanese people …

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Nov 15

Shichi-go-san celebrated today in Japan

Shichi-go-san is a festival celebrated by parents on the 15th of November in Japan, to mark the growth of their children as they turn seven, five, and three years of age. Shichi-go-san literally means seven, five, and three. These ages are considered critical in a child’s life. Particularly, at the age of seven, a young …

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Nov 11

Behind the scenes with iBook vocabulary2: Greetings

Fly Catcher Boy introduces the reader to the “Top 4” greetings commonly used in Japan. First, ohayo (Ohio).  Ohayo is a casual, informal version of the more polite “ohayo-goziamas” which you should use when entering the school staff room or the local grocery store (after the staff shout “irrashai-mase” or welcome, in unison).  A humble head …

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Oct 23

Speed dating for Authors!

The Vancouver Children’s Literature Roundtable hosted an exciting event recently: DARK ALCHEMY: Literary Brews Conjured Across the Curriculum, featuring Kenneth Oppel talking about his new work “This Dark Endeavor: The Apprenticeship of Victor Frankenstein…and the Frankenstein Myth”. This engaging, humorous author held his audience in the palm of his hand as he offered some insights …

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Sep 29

Updates to my website

After lots of hardwork and attention to detail, the “media” page on my website has been updated with new information, author/illustrator photos and bios, a press release, plus iBook & print version info sales sheets.  Thanks to my creative project manager, Crystal Stranaghan, for doing such a fine job……and, did I mention a new Youtube video? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i67sgPA5fTg

Aug 21

FLY CATCHER BOY print version now up on AMAZON

Yipee~  Fly Catcher Boy is now available in print on Amazon.com (Amaozon.ca shows “temporarily out of stock” but go ahead and order anyway; it will ship fairly quickly despite the notation).  The print version now joins the iBook, covering digital and print needs.  Self-publishing has been quite a journey and I could never have done it on …

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Jun 02

The wait is over…

Fly Catcher Boy for the iPAD* now available Fly Catcher Boy, first published by Gumboot Books, Vancouver 2009) has been re-worked and re-launched as a dual-language English story with Japanese words throughout, an interactive version brought to life by Simon Hayama’s narration, and Hailey Sabourin’s manga-style illustrations. The read-it-to-me page by page audio option with sound …

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Sep 22

Fly Catcher Boy travels to Japan….and ends up in a museum!

Being married to a Japanese national has some definite perks when it comes to sourcing out marketing opportunities in Japan. Takeshi has found a variety of great locations there, intent on introducing Fly Catcher Boy, my bi-lingual English/Japanese book for children, to millions of kids in his homeland. The OSHIMA MUSEUM OF PICTURE BOOKS, located …

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Aug 10

What’s in a name?

When I tell people I have a bi-lingual kid’s book coming out in the fall, they react positively and eventually ask “what’s the title?”  When I tell them FLY CATCHER BOY, I sense some confusion on their part.  A book about a boy who catches flies.  Yuck.  What could possibly be interesting about a dirty habit? 

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