Tag Archive: manga

Oct 21

Sayonara Baby!

NB:  while this initial post was created October 5, it’s now 17 days on, 22 October!  I know I promised to blog daily but….life got in the way.  I’ll have some solid bullet train time as I travel north for Tokyo, Sendai, and Morioka (Oct 23-26) to catch up on the past 17 days’ experiences …

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Jan 06

Japanese New Year

    O-Shogatsu (New Year’s Day) is the most festive occasion of the entire year for Japanese citizens . While we are scrambling for deals over the post-Christmas season, Japan is “closed for business”.  The Emperor’s birthday is celebrated on December 23 followed by traditional ceremonies and customs that last for several days.  Most Japanese people …

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Nov 23

Labor Thanksgiving Day in Japan

Thanksgiving is celebrated worldwide in so many different and unique ways.  In Japan, November 23 is Labor Thanksgiving Day, a second national holiday in November!  It became a holiday in 1948 as a day for citizens to express gratitude to one another for work done throughout the year and for the fruits of those labors. …

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Nov 15

Shichi-go-san celebrated today in Japan

Shichi-go-san is a festival celebrated by parents on the 15th of November in Japan, to mark the growth of their children as they turn seven, five, and three years of age. Shichi-go-san literally means seven, five, and three. These ages are considered critical in a child’s life. Particularly, at the age of seven, a young …

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Oct 23

Speed dating for Authors!

The Vancouver Children’s Literature Roundtable hosted an exciting event recently: DARK ALCHEMY: Literary Brews Conjured Across the Curriculum, featuring Kenneth Oppel talking about his new work “This Dark Endeavor: The Apprenticeship of Victor Frankenstein…and the Frankenstein Myth”. This engaging, humorous author held his audience in the palm of his hand as he offered some insights …

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Aug 23

The ancient art of storytelling in Japan…

  Kamishibai (kah-mee-she-bye) originated in Japan but are part of a long,  Asian picture storytelling tradition beginning as early as the 9th century when priests used illustrated scrolls combined with narration to convey Buddhist doctrine to lay audiences.

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